Home Sauna Buying Guide

Home Sauna Buying Guide

Saunas here. Saunas there. Saunas over 3000 years ago and saunas today. Everywhere we look we seem to find people going into this hot rooms and come out relaxed as ever. And when you go to a spa, it can cost you $500 to $1500 per year. With this much money being thrown around saunas must be that beneficial. The Mayans surely think so, with them having sweat house over 3,000 years ago. Fast forward to today, 1 out of 3 every Finns use saunas! From the Mayans to the Finnish saunas are truly beneficial, the question is, are you prepared to buy one for yourself?

For you to find out whether or not you’re prepared to buy one of these saunas for your home, we take a look at some important aspects before buying your very own personal individual sauna in your backyard or home. These important aspects include your budget, the location, the size, the outside aesthetics, and heater type.

What Is Your Budget?

Let’s start with the budget. For a couple of thousand dollars, you can get a good deal on the internet. But here’s the thing: what you see is not necessarily what you get. Sometimes people could give you a fake offer at the same time you don’t know the quality of the home sauna kit when it arrives at your house. These poor quality kits include cracks, lost parts, lost instructions, and worse instructions are included but the English are definitely lost. Moving up just a couple of thousand of dollars you could get a branded one. These could be made at your house when you buy it. These kits are called prefabricated saunas.

A note to remember before we move to specifics. Generally, as you move on up to the price scale, things get more than luxurious, things like space, wood finish, as well as, overall aesthetics. But generally sticking to the $1000 to $3000 price range could give you a good value for your money especially when you compare that a yearly expenditure of the average American ranges from a thousand dollars to $1500. Now for the money wouldn’t you actually just get your own personal sauna that is in your very own backyard?

Home Sauna Buying Guide

Where Are You Located?

Comparing indoor versus outdoor, indoor saunas are typically found fitting within a bathroom where the power is right there all you would need is good ventilation. Ventilation is very important when you are generating that much steam. On the other hand, choosing an outdoor location allows you to be very lenient with how big you want your sauna will be, also, you would not have to worry about the steam building up because the outdoors is your ventilation. With these benefits to having it outdoors, one major drawback with having a sauna for the outdoors is the maintenance. 

Moving on to the size, size actually matters. Ask yourself, would you rather sauna alone or sauna with friends? Rebirth PRO Saunas can be used as an individual personal sauna in your own very bathroom, which is perfect. Also, it can be used with your friends, but you must take turns. Regarding cost, a small sauna can run along $3000 while really big saunas which look like a whole house reach up to or up to $12000.

Outside Of Aesthetics

To find the best material and type for your sauna, you have to know what your choices are. The three most common sauna wood types are cedar, aspen, and hemlock. 

Cedar

Home Sauna Buying Guide

Being the most popular choice for saunas there is a reason why this would is the most popular for saunas. Cedarwood is naturally resistant to insects & mildew making it a long lasting type of material. It is a very good option for the outdoors because is these qualities make it resistant to degradation. Furthermore, cedarwood has been known to have medicinal properties. On top of that, cedar smells good it is very aromatic, and like the previous characteristics mentioned, it is long lasting. For these qualities, cedar tends to be the most expensive and the highest quality of the bunch.

Aspen

Home Sauna Buying Guide

Looking at the other side of the price scale aspen is generally the cheapest of the bunch. But this cheap price tag comes with compromises. Such compromises can be found in its durability. The main problem with its durability is its lacking in its resistance to mildew or insects making it very susceptible to rot. On the other hand, although this would is very susceptible to rot that could easily be mitigated by keeping it in an enclosed area or an area where moisture is kept at a very low level. If this is achieved this particular would is actually really good for people with allergies because it does not have an odor which could trigger people who are allergic.

Hemlock

Home Sauna Buying Guide

Lastly, hemlock is also what people use for saunas. Like cedarwood, its aroma is very pleasant, making it very good for people with allergies or people who just don’t like the smell. In addition, it’s light wood color is very appealing to people who have interior palettes color palettes that would need a lighter shade. Lastly just like cedar-hemlock is naturally resistant to stains and mildew. Although not specified to be resistant to insects it still definitely protected with its resistance to stains and mildew.

What Types Of Heaters Are Out There?

Last on the important things need to know on your home sauna buying guide is the heater that you would need for your sauna. What’s a sauna without a heater? Saunas have different ways to heat the room. First is traditional (electric or a steam generator) while the second is more seen use of infrared.

Traditional

With the traditional method, the sauna is heated by rocks that are heated to reach a hundred and ninety-five degrees using an electric heater. Heating these rocks can take 22 to 25 minutes. Furthermore, this method is indirect making it less efficient. One of the good things is that you’re able to control the humidity by managing how much hot water to pour on the rocks which create this steam.

Steam generators are still the healthiest way to heat up your cedar barrel, or just a Finnish sauna. Steam is considered nature’s moisturizer, why electric heaters might dry your skin and your hair even more. Rebirth PRO cedar barrel saunas are used only with the finest steam generators. Our beautiful saunas heat up in just 15 minutes!

Home Sauna Buying Guide

Infrared

Infrared, unlike the traditional method, is indirect heating. In this scenario, an electric infrared machine heats the person indirectly. It is, for this reason, that heat up time takes a lot less compared to the traditional method. But the benefits of using infrared saunas are still unknown to science, making it a very questionable type of sauna. 

 

With these highlighted aspects, we hope you’re one step closer to being prepared when buying your first home sauna!

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